All Dog Owners Need To Know The Alarming Hidden Danger Of Walking A Pup On Hot Pavement

All dog owners have one thing in common: they love their pups and want to keep them safe.

That’s why we dress them up in reflective bandanas and keep them from eating dangerous food!

Many of us also know that there are season-specific dangers. We know that dogs need special care in the winter to keep them warm and keep their paws safe from salt and ice.

However, most people don’t realize that dogs have summer needs as well.

In addition to needing extra water to stay hydrated, dogs also need cool places to relax and additional care for their paws.

Now that summer is here and the days are sweltering, it’s important for every dog owner to remember how hot the pavement can get.

Pavement and concrete have the ability to hold onto heat for hours. The ground can become incredibly hot, even if the weather doesn’t feel that hot.

One woman posted about the problem on Facebook, and her post has quickly gone viral.

WARNING: Some readers may find the following content upsetting. If you do not wish to see evidence of animal injury, please click back to the Waggingtonpost homepage.

Facebook / Debbie French

Debbie French posted three photos on Facebook, reminding her friends to keep their dogs safe this summer.

Her post immediately went viral — in less than two weeks, her post had almost 400,000 shares.

Facebook / Debbie French

Debbie wrote:

It’s getting hotter outside every day. These pictures are the result of a dog being walked on pavement in 80°F. 

It doesn’t seem like it would be too hot does it?

Facebook / Debbie French

Before you take your dog for a walk, take off your shoes & stand on the pavement.

If it’s too hot for you, it’s too hot for your dog. Let’s keep our furbabies safe this summer.

Facebook / Debbie French

These photos may be difficult to look at, but they’re important for every dog owner to see.

We often assume that our dogs’ paws are very tough, but they can actually be quite soft, which makes them vulnerable to injury.

The photos above show a severe burn, but signs of less severe burns include redness and blistering.

Max Pixel

Before heading outside with your dog on a walk, check to see how hot the ground is. If you think it is too hot, wait for the ground to cool off, or avoid walking your dog on cement and pavement.

If the paved ground is too hot, you can always opt to walk your dog on the grass or on a trail.

According to Liberty Home and Pet Services, blacktop can get up to 140°F when the temperature only reads 80°F.

Wikimedia / HTO

After going outside with your dog in the summer, you should look at their paws to make sure they still look OK.

They shouldn’t have any cuts, shouldn’t look raw, shouldn’t have any blisters, and definitely shouldn’t be missing any parts of the protective layer of the pad.

According to PetMD, a dog will typically show signs of discomfort if the ground is too hot (like limping or whining) or if their paws are burned (like licking their wounds).

Pet Expertise

If you notice that your dog has particularly sensitive paws, or you live in an area where you can only walk on pavement, consider buying your dog some booties.

Many people have booties for their dogs to wear in winter, but they’re also great for when the ground is too hot.

If for some reason these preventative measures don’t work and your pup’s paws get burned, take them to the vet — they can prescribe antibiotics and bandage your dog’s paws.

Pixabay / Tiinuska

Keeping your dog safe in the summer is extremely important, and it’s best to know as much as possible about your dog’s health.

If you think everyone should know how to take care of their dogs’ paws, please SHARE this article with your friends!

More: How Hot Does it Get in a Parked Car? Ask Dr. Ernie Ward!
More: If you see a dog in a hot car this summer, remember this simple hack
More: What To Do If You See A Dog In A Hot Car

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